Reflections from the Former Minister of Health of Mozambique on the Work of Global Health Actors

Reflections from the Former Minister of Health of Mozambique on the Work of Global Health Actors

We invited Dr. Francisco Songane, the former minister of health of Mozambique, to speak at our symposium, ‘Disrupting Global Health Narratives: Alternative Perspectives on the World Bank’s Influence on Global Health,’ hosted by the Brocher Foundation near Geneva, Switzerland in January 2019. Drawing on his vast experience working with global health institutions in many different capacities, Dr. Songane gave an important talk about the responsibilities and roles of global health actors and researchers in promoting health for all, and he has generously permitted us to post it on our blog for all to learn from him.

Primary Healthcare and Emergency Preparedness - Was Astana a missed opportunity?

Primary Healthcare and Emergency Preparedness - Was Astana a missed opportunity?

Over the past year, particularly since Dr Tedros’ election as the Director-General of the World Health Organisation, there has also been a large focus on the development of countries’ Primary Healthcare (PHC) systems. This post offers reflections on Astana Conference, on PHC and the missed opportunity with emergency preparedness.

WHAT WOULD WE SAY TO YOUNG PEOPLE WHO ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT GLOBAL HEALTH?

WHAT WOULD WE SAY TO YOUNG PEOPLE WHO ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT GLOBAL HEALTH?

Last week, a few of us global health students and researchers at the University of Edinburgh got together to watch the live-streaming of the Women Leaders in Global Health (WLGH) 2018 Conference held at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. In this post, we present 6 tips on leadership, emerging from this conference.

ACHIEVING Global Health Security and Universal Health Coverage

ACHIEVING Global Health Security and Universal Health Coverage

Very few research centres study Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and Global Health Security (GHS) at the same time. I share my reflections on the Achieving Global Health Security workshop held in Edinburgh in May this year, jointly organised by the Global Health Governance Programme at the University of Edinburgh and the Centre for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University.

Global health governance - to support the new or to strengthen the old?

Global health governance - to support the new or to strengthen the old?

The rise of new economic powers since the post-1945 creation of the Bretton Woods institutions – including the establishment of the World Bank in 1944 and World Health Organisation (WHO) in 1948 – has caused a paradigm shift in global health. There are growing calls to reform global governance structures to better reflect global realities. What implications do the changing nature of global governance arrangements have for global health diplomacy?

Boosting Formula Sales and Endangering Babies

Boosting Formula Sales and Endangering Babies

“What if governments had a proven, cost-effective way to save babies’ lives, reduce rates of malnutrition, support children’s health, increase educational attainment and grow productivity? They do: It’s called breastfeeding. And it is one of the best investments nations can make in the lives and futures of their youngest members – and in the long-term strength of their societies.”

Supporting New & Diverse Voices in Global Health

Supporting New & Diverse Voices in Global Health

The leading voices of global health policy are primarily drawn from a small, closely connected network of mostly Western, mostly male perspectives. In fact, in the last four issues of the Lancet (May 26- June 16, 2018) the authors of commentaries were predominantly male, white, trained and working in a European or American institution, and in a senior position.[1]  We see a similar pattern amongst experts quoted in media articles related to health security.[i],[ii] These experts have distinguished careers, and shape ongoing debates, dialogues and policies. While respecting these voices and experiences, we must also make room in ongoing debates for a more diverse community of scholars and practitioners…


Health Systems for Prosperity and Solidarity: leaving no one behind

Health Systems for Prosperity and Solidarity: leaving no one behind

The high-level meeting “Health Systems for Prosperity and Solidarity: leaving no one behind” has a theme – include, invest, innovate. “Include” means improving coverage, access and financial protection for everyone, “invest” refers to making the case for investing in health systems, and, lastly, “innovate” is about harnessing innovations and systems to meet people’s needs

Toward policy innovations from the field: a report from a Syrian refugee camp

Toward policy innovations from the field: a report from a Syrian refugee camp

“Between a high, solid wall and an egg that breaks against it, I will always stand on the side of the egg… Each of us is, more or less, an egg. Each of us is a unique, irreplaceable soul enclosed in a fragile shell. This is true of me, and it is true of each of you. And each of us, to a greater or lesser degree, is confronting a high, solid wall. The wall has a name: It is The System. The System is supposed to protect us, but sometimes it takes on a life of its own…”

Haruki Murakami, 2009

Panel on Impact Evaluation in the Senegalese Health System

Panel on Impact Evaluation in the Senegalese Health System

How do we measure the impact of health interventions and how does the measurement of health or of health’s absence impact global health discourse and funding? How is the measuring of health co-constructive of ideas about what health is and what kinds of negotiations are underway in health development in Senegal as the country works towards universal health coverage?